September 6– Christopher Kiplok, counsel to the trustee in the liquidations of Lehman Brothers and MF Global, writes about the principal lesson of the largest and eighth-largest bankruptcies in history in this CNBC commentary: Lehman and MF Global taught the need to prepare for the next financial collapse.

The United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York recently held that it had personal jurisdiction over a foreign defendant that was paid funds pursuant to the Court’s order approving the debtors’ post-petition financing (the “DIP order”), denying defendant Immigon’s[1] motion to dismiss an adversary proceeding commenced by the Motors Liquidation

After a 2014 decision in the Southern District of New York holding that section 316(b) of the Trust Indenture Act (“TIA”) barred any non-consensual restructuring that impaired a creditor’s actual ability to receive payment, issuers, creditors and the financial markets more generally have been uncertain as to the contours of permissible out-of-court restructurings.

This article can be found in the New York Law Journal‘s Corporate Restructuring and Bankruptcy special report.

Amidst the sometimes dramatic fluctuations in commodity prices that buffet the oil and gas industry, investors generally relied on one segment of the market to be safe and stable: so-called “midstream” companies that own the pipelines that

In order to be retained to provide bankruptcy services to a debtor, most professionals generally need to satisfy the “disinterestedness” requirement of Bankruptcy Code Section 327(a). Typically, in order to be “disinterested,” among other things, the professional in most cases cannot be a creditor of the debtor, have outstanding invoices, at the time of the

Yesterday, the Supreme Court granted certiorari in Czyzewski v. Jevic Holding Corp (“Jevic”). As previously reported, Jevic addressed whether a bankruptcy court can approve a settlement agreement that provides for distributions that violate the absolute priority rules as part of the structured dismissal of a chapter 11 proceeding. The Third Circuit held

Last summer, the HHR Bankruptcy Report analyzed the Third Circuit’s ruling in Official Committee of Unsecured Creditors v. CIT Group/Business Credit Inc. (In re Jevic Holding Corp.),[1] which approved, as part of the structured dismissal of a chapter 11 proceeding, a settlement agreement that allowed distributions that violated the absolute priority rule.  Following the

The Third Circuit’s decision in In re Trump Entertainment presents interesting opportunities for employers with expired collective bargaining agreements (“CBAs”) seeking to reorganize their companies under Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code. [1] In In re Trump Entertainment, the Court held that a debtor may reject an expired CBA under Section 1113 of the

Section 1110 of the Bankruptcy Code provides special protections to lenders and lessors that lease, finance, or conditionally sell aircraft equipment.  In 2000, Congress amended section 1110 to add section 1110(c), which provides that a debtor must “immediately surrender and return” aircraft equipment to a secured party if such party is entitled to possession under

A recent decision by Judge Shelley C. Chapman of the Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York in the Sabine Oil & Gas chapter 11 cases[1] could have significant commercial implications on a U.S. energy sector already stressed by an extended period of low commodity prices.  Relying on Bankruptcy Code section 365(a)’s